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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

1 edition of Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife found in the catalog.

Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife

Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife

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Published by Wildlife Society in [Washington, D.C. ] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mines and mineral resources -- Environmental aspects -- Arctic regions.,
  • Mines and mineral resources -- Environmental aspects -- Northwest Territories.,
  • Mineral industries -- Environmental aspects -- Arctic regions.,
  • Mineral industries -- Environmental aspects -- Northwest Territories.,
  • Animals -- Effect of human beings on -- Arctic regions.,
  • Animals -- Effect of human beings on -- Northwest Territories.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesJournal of wildlife management (Supplement)
    Statementby Chris J. Johnson ... [et. al.].
    SeriesWildlife monographs -- no.160.
    ContributionsJohnson, Chris J., Wildlife Society.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination36 p. :
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16129693M

    “Arctic development is neither of those things.” Mr Bernhardt said he expected oil production in the area to begin in around eight years and that activity could continue for more than 50 years. (2) The ratios of line miles in each disturbance category is the same as that resulting from the seismic surveys in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Emers et al. ~. (3) The recovery rate in each disturbance category is the same as that in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge studies.

    As the Director of Philanthropy, Biz leads fundraising and development for WCS Canada. Biz joined WCS Canada in December Prior to arriving at WCS Canada in , she worked at Nature Conservancy Canada (NCC) as Director of US Programmes and at WWF Canada focusing on several conservation portfolios: Eastern Arctic marine mammals, Canadian Prairie wildlife, WWF Canadian .   Introduction. Alpine ecosystems are significant for biodiversity,, but only cover between –% of the Earth’s terrestrial landmass (excluding the Antarctic landmass;,).Many alpine and subalpine environments support highly endemic communities of taxa, such as reptiles, birds, and invertebrates,.These ecosystems are also thought to be sensitive to human development.

    APPENDIX barrel ($ or $ per gallon), then a willingness-to-pay of about $ or $ annually per family in the U.S. would be necessary to match the value of oil development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at a 4% rate of interest or $ to $ annually at . Inherent in understanding the full suite of impacts—both beneficial and detrimental—is the need to understand the cumulative effects of all changes (human and natural) in the Arctic. The development of a comprehensive, quantitative, cumulative effects analysis for the Arctic OCS remains a challenge.


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Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife. [Chris J Johnson; Mark S Boyce; Ray Case; H Dean Cluff; Robert J Gau; Anne Gunn, (Wildlife manager); R Mulders; Wildlife Society,;] -- "Recent discoveries of diamondiferous kimberlite deposits in the Canadian central Arctic led to unprecedented levels of mineral exploration and development.

Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife. Cumulative Effects of Human Developments on Arctic Wildlife. levels of mineral exploration and development. The cumulative effects of such activities are an issue of concern for government. Abstract: Recent discoveries of diamondiferous kimberlite deposits in the Canadian central Arctic led to unprecedented levels of mineral exploration and development.

The cumulative effects of such activities are an issue of concern for government regulatory agencies, regional and international conservation organizations, wildlife managers, and indigenous by: "Supplement to the Journal of Wildlife Management." Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (pages ).

Database: WorldCat Additional physical form entry: Online version:Cumulative effects of human developments on arctic wildlife. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENTS ON ARCTIC WILDLIFE CHRIS J. JOHNSON 1, 2 Department of Biological Sciences, Z Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada MARK S.

BOYCE Department of Biological Sciences, Z Biological Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9. Case studies include cumulative effects in the Canadian Arctic, border issues with Mexico, suburban and exurban landscapes, scenic resources, and the cumulative impacts of energy development on sage-grouse.

Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management brings to light the crucial connections between human expansion and habitat destruction for Manufacturer: CRC Press. As humans continue to encroach on wildlands, quality and quantity of wildlife habitat decreases before our eyes. A housing development here, a shopping mall there, a few more trees cut here, another road put in there, each of these diminishes available habitat.

Unless the cumulative effects of multiple simultaneous development projects are recognized and incorporated at the beginning of. Human activities in the Arctic are often mentioned as recipients of climate-change impacts. In this paper we consider the more complicated but more likely possibility that human activities themselves can interact with climate or environmental change in ways that either mitigate or exacerbate the human impacts.

Although human activities in the Arctic are generally assumed to be modest, our. low level of human development. Our study highlights the importance of assessing effects of human disturbances at various spatiotemporal scales, and of considering the relative influence of other non-anthropogenic factors to fully understand drives of wildlife populations.

Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Canada uses a unique blend of on-the-ground scientific research and policy action to help protect wildlife across Canada. Our scientists are leaders in developing solutions to address conservation challenges, from the impacts of climate change on wildlife and wild areas to the cumulative effects of resource.

The book. frames the issue and introduces readers to major types of extraction; quantifies the pace and extent of current and future energy development; provides an ecological foundation for understanding cumulative impacts on wildlife species; synthesizes information on the biological response of wildlife to development.

Case studies include cumulative effects in the Canadian Arctic, border issues with Mexico, suburban and exurban landscapes, scenic resources, and the cumulative impacts of energy development on sage-grouse.

Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management brings to light the crucial connections between human expansion and habitat destruction for.

Established inCARC is a well-respected non-partisan, public interest, research and advocacy organization. Composed of citizens committed to environmentally-responsible northern development, support for the rights of Indigenous peoples, respect for the authority of northern territorial governments and increased international co-operation in the circumpolar world, CARC has a reputation.

This implies a need for attention to the possible effects of endocrine-disrupters on the ability of Arctic wildlife to adapt to environmental alterations caused by climate change. Relationships between POPs and hormones in Arctic wildlife imply that these chemicals pose a threat to the endocrine systems of these species.

Schultz C. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: a study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest.

Environ. Impact Assess. Rev. 32 (1): Crossref, Google Scholar. Cumulative landscape change has the potential to affect communities that are linked to their local environment through subsistence harvesting (Berkes and Jolly, ; Parlee et al., ; Shanley et al., ), particularly in Arctic indigenous communities, where a high reliance on local landscapes for food security intensifies the impact of environmental change on human health and.

Arriving at clear definitions of thresholds remains a challenge in cumulative effects management, and approaches range from restrictions on any development in pristine landscapes (Ehrlich,   Wildlife parasitology has always recognized the importance of abiotic determinants of the survival and development of environmental stages of parasites, and effects of environmental change on host–parasite relationships are increasingly recogni 15, 16, illustrating the importance of the environmental component in One Health.

of the cumulative effects models showed that, in general, nonwinter activities had a higher level of cumulative effects than groomed and designated winter route activities. Habitats in which cumulative effects were ranked as having a high level of human influence in many analysis units included core areas for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

directly on wolves have published over thirty-three books and monographs on wolves as well as TWS/JHUP Wildlife Book Series Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Wildlife Management starting July Monographs (wolf-related): Cumulative effects of human developments on Arctic wildlife, Wildlife Monographs ( with J.

Johnson, R. Chase, H.Cumulative Effects in Wildlife Management: Impact Mitigation, CRC Press. Johnson, C.J., and St-Laurent, M-H. A unifying framework for understanding the impacts of human developments for wildlife.

In D. Naugle, editor. Energy Development and Wildlife Conservation in Western North America, Island Press. Up to 90% off Textbooks at Amazon Canada. Plus, free two-day shipping for six months when you sign up for Amazon Prime for Students.